The Seamworks Akita

I’ve decided to try to make one, new Seamworks pattern a month to justify my subscription more, (although in busy months I might let myself off with a repeat, such as my recent Oslo Cardigan). The Akita is a simple, t-shirt design cut from one piece. It takes just one yard of fabric and can be made up in a variety of light-weight fabrics, so I also thought it would be a useful design to add to my repertoire. I struggle with tops during MeMadeMay every year too, so I’m well aware I need to get a few made up between now and then to make life easier.

 

I had this lovely grey/green (think the fashion world named it griege at one point) pear fabric in my stash, and not having sewn with wovens for a while, it was calling out to me 🙂 The pattern, like most of the Seamworks designs I’ve attempted was super easy, so would suit beginners well. The only bit of the pattern that took me a little thought was making my own bias binding, which I’ve pretty much avoided doing up to now. But as it’s pretty frustrating having to get to the shops every time you need some, I figured it was about time I learnt this skill. Armed with my newly purchased bias binder maker, which I haven’t quite mastered but I can already see makes the job easier, I didn’t make too bad a job of this. More practice needed but I’m really pleased with the neat outcome it results in.

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I’ve worn the finished result ‘out’ for these photos to show the design more clearly, but I think it will be a lot more flattering tucked in on my figure. I do really like the side slits though, so having the option to wear it loose is nice for the weekends. I also like the kimono sleeves on this, which kind of prettily frill out, although there’s still frost on the ground here, so it might be a while yet until I get to wear it on its own… Love how it matches my Oslo cardigan perfectly too 🙂

The only slight fit issue appears to be the neckline not sitting quite right. Not sure if this is my bias binding’s fault or the result of needing a FBA. Any ideas? I know I need to give the FBA a go, but those of you who have mastered this, what kind of pattern would be the best to make a first stab at this? Would it work on this or a more fitted bodice best? All those triangle diagrams quite frankly scare me! In the mean time I think making this in a lighter fabric, or even a knit would eliminate this problem. Avoidance, moi? 😉

Pattern: Seamworks Akita Blouse

Size: 4

New Skills: making my own bias binding 🙂

Estimated time: 1 hour

Actual time: 1 1/2 hours (making the bias binding…)

Adjustments: none so far…

Soundtrack: Radio 4

 

 

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39 thoughts on “The Seamworks Akita

  1. This is a great staple top! I really like the side splits & the pear fabric you’ve used! I can’t comment about an FBA as I’ve been avoiding doing one for quite some time now! :-0

  2. Lovely top, I’ve had this printed to try for ages but not quite got to it! An FBA really isn’t that scary once you get the hang of it. I seem to remember a really good tutorial on one of the By Hand London sew alongs

  3. You’ll soon get hook on home made bias tape – it’s so much softer and easier to work with than the shop bought stuff. Do you do Craftsy?? I bought a class – sewing on the edge – it’s really good for different ways of using bias tape, and a really easy way of making it without a special gadget 🙂

    • Thank you. I think I tried making it really early on, when it made absolutely no sense to me so was put off by it. While I’m not totally ruling out the shop-bought stuff, making your own does really ‘finish’ an item better I think 🙂

  4. This is such a pretty top. I really like griege (that’s a new one on me)! I think you should bite the bullet and try doing an FBA and see what you think. I did one for my Cami dress (the one in my mini profile picture) and the fit on the bodice is spot on. The rest of the dress is pants but the bodice is spot on! I’ve also carried out an FBA on the By Hand London Kim bodice toile that also worked brilliantly although I have yet to make that pattern for real! The BHL sewalongs have brilliant instructions for carrying them out that anyone can easily understand. The Holly jumpsuit has 2 FBA posts, one of the bodices has darts and the other one hasn’t so a mixture of the two would probably work for this top? An hour or two of your time and some cheap fabric, you’ve got nothing to lose really! Good luck! 🙂 🙂

    • Thank you. I’m hoping it will be really useful once it warms up a bit. I work part-time, so get one day off a week, so in between boring chores it usually becomes my sewing day 🙂 That or I usually squeeze a morning or afternoon in over the weekend. I prefer a good chunk of time rather than an hour here and an hour there, but like you it doesn’t always happen…

  5. Am another avoider of trying an FBA, and am debating whether or not to do that with this Morris I’m trying. Sorry I can’t help you out, but can admire your new top. Lovely binding! Did you use a double needle? Whatever you did, it looks lovely!

    • Love how all the FBA-avoiders are coming out of the woodwork 🙂 Didn’t Thimberlina do a lovely, white Morris, she might be able to advise you?
      And he double/twin needle is another thing I’m studiously avoiding… 😉

  6. Your top looks great! I don’t see any issue with the neckline from these pictures. I also can’t help with the FBA, but I’ve done a few SBAs and they are not too scary. I think an FBA is a similar process. It would be best to try one on a bodice with darts, I think, before jumping into one on an un-darted top like this. Good luck with it!

  7. Love that fabric and it looks like a very useful and wearable pattern – it reminds me a lot of the Zippy Top. I’m also scared of the idea of doing a FBA 🙈 so let me know how you get on if you do one!

    • Thank you, on this crisp cotton (maybe had a hint of linen in it too) it really wasn’t too bad. I tried it with some slippery material over the weekend and it was incredibly difficult, but still love the neat finish it gives. The little gadget is def. worth it 🙂

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